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20130121
20130129
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relationships on behalf of the presidents and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world. but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and continuing to work with you for the issues that you champion over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of biological weapons, fighting for human rights against hiv/a.i.d.s. around the world. if your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel and through cooperation where possible and isolation where necessary as in the case of iran. of course, it goes without saying that you have truly been a world leader in one of the most consequential issues of our time, climate change. it heartens me to know that you will be our voice to the world. whatever challenges
, very close to the president, isn't he? >> reporter: that's right. in a foreign policy capacity he has been. this is someone who's been very much inside president obama's close circle. he's advised him during the troop withdrawal in iraq, the current one going on in afghanistan and he's in a photo that's now become famous. he was in the situation room during the raid on osama bin laden's house. you'll see him sitting next to secretary of state hillary clinton. it goes back mump further than that. he has been here at the white house since the beginning of president obama's first term. in fact, he helped him as he was coming in to the white house and their time together goes all the way back to when president obama was a senator-elect, when he was coming from being a state legislator in illinois to the senate. so all the way back to his time where he first came to washington. he also was a foreign policy adviser, ashleigh, to the former senate majority leader tom daschle. so he has quite a long credential when it comes to foreign policy, but also he'll obviously be dealing as well with d
this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her look, they're actually considering you as possibility for secretary of state. >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: he is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after the election day after hearing it from two reporters. and her reply was, not for a million reasons. >> if she hesitated, why not just say no? >> i think she did, or she came very close, i think the president persuaded her. >> reporter: clinton was quickly confirmed, but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everybody expected there would be a lot of division, secretary of clinton going behind his back. >> reporter: so was there any tension between the people at the top? >> i think everybody has been surprised. >> reporter: surprised that while secretary clinton and president obama have been separated often as she travels the world, they have maintained a unified front. >> and she has spoken of that relationship, you know, once adversearies,
american foreign policy. but what are the high points? what can she point to to say i did that during tenure as secretary of state? >> the reality is she was trapped in a way, caught between an a cruel and unforgiving world which is not terribly hospitable to big successes, and she didn't have any. on the other hand, she was caught with a foreign policy president, barack obama, who's the most withholding and controlling since richard nixon. he wasn't going to delegate many of the big-ticket items. i think shea made it out of necessity. she identified her own issues. i call them planetary humanism -- women's issues, gend gender issues, social networking, internet freedoms, press freedoms. they're all very important, 21st century issue, but they're not the kind of issues that get you into the secretary of state hall of fame. a very fine secretary of state nonetheless. >> and the benghazi, libya, situation will follow her, yes? >> absolutely. >> yeah. polls show she is one of the most admired women if not the most admired woman in the world. is she the front-runner for the white house in
on the foreign policy side. that's true. that is certainly a different choice for chief of staff when the economy remains issue number one. the fact of the matter is that jacob lew moving from chief of staff over to the treasury department and joe biden are perfectly capable of managing capitol hill and what needs to be done next in terms of bills and the budget and all of that kind of stuff. i think what makes mcdonough choice so interesting is it's a legacy choice. this is a man who has been at the president's side since the president's national career started as a freshman senator. he was there through the election. he has been at the white house all this time. this is a man whose loyalties to the president and who will protect the president, which is really the number one job of chief of staff. i think it's a very interesting choice and someone that the president trusts fully because now the president is putting together what will be these final years of the obama era and this is a man that he trusts to protect the obama era. >> candy, people might not know this. when the president gets that
promoted the internet and facebook, twitter as tools in diplomacy and foreign policy making, probably more than any other person working in our government. >> sounds like a very modern secretary of state but does come at a price in benghazi and that hearing she had where she said, does it really matter what happened on the ground? this will come back to haunt her no matter what she does. >> if she runs for president, though some of the sound bites from the hearings will obviously be used by her republican opponents and opponents and the like because there is a great retort to her that if you take that sound bite, it does matter and you hear republicaninging doing that this week. i would say benghazi is the low water mark. but plenty of other achievements. if she writes the memoir right she might be able to frame benghazi and the emotion she has of losing the lives of those americans in benghazi under her watch. >> she was criticized for not dumping bill during the monica lewinsky affairs. still one of the most admired woman in the world and leaves the secretary's position with very high nu
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
might have climate change, the foreign policy or restructuring of america's place in the world. prams leading from the back as he said in stern phases rather than the front. i'm in favor of that. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about it and will tackle it this year. there's common sense agreement out in the states how to do it. i think you'll see the president work passionately across party lines on education to make our k through 12 system the best in the world like our university system is. you hit the biggest one and that's economy. we have to continue to take steps. >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> talks about education is if we're going to be competitive, we have to do a better job on education. we've got to control our energy in the future. we've got to develop new sources of energy. we've got to invest in research and development and stay on the cutting edge of innovation. all these things are an sbintegl part of develo
. economy, obviously. you might have climate change. >> right. >> the foreign policy, the restructuring if you like of america's place in the world, taking on where barack obama has taken it so far. very interesting. perhaps leading from the back as he said in certain cases rather than from the front. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about we'll tackle this year. everyone out there understands our system is broken. and we need some fundamental restructuring of it. right thing to do. there's common sense agreement out in the states on how to do it. people putting politics aside. i think you will see the president in the second term work passionately across party lines on education to make the k-12 system the best in the world like the university system is. you hit the biggest one, that's the economy. we have to continue to take the steps -- >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> as a government -- >> talks about education, it is axiomat
on jobs and on foreign policy, making america stronger in trade and national security. >> the way you talk it makes it sound as if we don't have a really divided congress. talking to people on both sides pretty much every day of my work day. >> nothing worthwhile is easy and every inch of ground the president has to gain. but a lot of wind at his back right now and i won't say he will do lay-ups, but this president delivered through his first term. he has been able to do a lot in the first term. the second term will be a good one. >> do you think we'll hear in the inauguration address that talks about that? will you hear -- they told us, unity and hopeful. that's about it. but do you think you will hear -- he will talk about reaching out an olive branch to republicans? >> this is a republican i have heard talk about the importance of america americans to step up. democracy is not a spectator sport. he needs all of us to be involved. all of us need to step up and play a role in the destiny of our country. in the end of the day, this is one of the greatest speakers we have seen in my generat
,000 front line jobs to women in the military. "outfront" tonight, rosa brooks, a columnist for foreign policy and has worked in the pentagon under the obama administration and david frum, former speech writer for george w. bush and critter for us. right now, 40% of active duty are women. this could be hundreds of thousand of jobs suddenly would be open to women. am i right in saying this is hublgly significant? >> it's absolutely enormous. the one thing i would say though, the it's not that we don't have women in combat positions. we have women who are ineligible under the former policy, but there really isn't any front line in today's wars. fighting heroically in combat, women who have died in combat. this change just recognizes what's already a reality, frankly. >> david, please be blunt. i know what you have to say is, might offend some people, but this is important. why do you think women in combat is not a good idea? >> i think we need to stress, this is quite an abstract notion. the number of women who will speak and equally is likely to be quite low, but of those who do, i think
our state department, and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> reporter: what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're considering you for the possibility of secretary of state. >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day, after hearing it from two reporters. and i'm pretty sure her reply was something along the lines of, not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton secretary of state designate. >> reporter: clinton was quickly confirmed. but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> so was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been s
more like the president thinks when it comes to foreign policy this will be a team that might not push back as much with regard to cuts or withdrawals or smaller footprints or reluctant moves with new eras. in terms of the worth of the man for him and the job they receive there, not at all. >> since you went there, let me sort of switch where i was going and ask you about the smaller footprint. we having coming up the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan at the end of the year, and we are seeing republicans already going, no, i think we need -- lindsay graham on, talked about up to 20,000. it's too important not to leave a substantial footprint there, and yet i think that the general is right that we now have a team that seems to be more in sync with president obama and they want a very small footprint. you talked in your book about training the afghan security forces, are they ready for a total withdrawal of u.s. troops when the time comes? >> i think they are not ready for lack of a strategic partnership in america. i wouldn't try to tell senior officers how many people
and others. >> i think from a foreign policy standpoint, the attention torn back to the middle east. it just will. my prediction is that we'll have the domestic fights but i think on the danger front i think sort of what the arab spring evolves in to, we don't know and it's a big x factor. >> what we're waiting for. grambling university marching band. lynyrd skynyrd performing. do you like him? >> sure. i don't know that i'm quite as enthusiastic about the music as you are but -- >> very enthusiastic. >> for those that don't know, wolf once had a band called the monkeys before the monkees. >> that's right. >> we have to tie him to the chair and waiting for the president and the vice president speaking at the candle light celebration. let's go to a break with grambling university and the marching band. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great
have a different engagement with the world. that both changes foreign policy but it also potentially frees up resources in domestic policy. >> he can use that as a springboard to say now that we have the opportunity, we must seize the moment. he's got this whole -- his wife now is getting very involved in the politics of this. she's going to be very involved in this. wow, look at that picture. whoa. >> i think we should acknowledge this is the anniversary of martin luther king day. he took that moment to pause before the statue in -- >> he wrapped himself in it the cloak of martin luther king today. >> something he hasn't always done in office -- >> very, very purposeful -- >> yes, i think that was sort of -- and you can see the concecon -- that martin luther king was so courageous, that i'm going to really state what i believe, here and now. >> i think it was martin luther king revisited. >> well, i'm not so sure i'd go that far. >> i know they don't. the white house, they don't. >> but i do believe that he -- the moment called for sort of laying out what you stand for. paying homag
and the opportunity i see for us. if this were a foreign policy speech, i think we'd call it the obama doctrine. it was the firmest commitment we've seen to a progressive agenda and that's why the liberal community is singing hosanas and there are views coming in from the liberals that were holding back and saying, he almost declared war. this was not about unity. this is what i want to pursue. >> but jessica, if this is about who he is, i assume -- does he, i guess let me pose it as a question. is it more important to be successful or lay out those principles where they are talking about gun control, immigration perhaps would have common ground, gay rights. he's picking some fights with the conservative republicans who still control the house. >> he -- obviously he wants to succeed. i think this was an action speech and what he was doing was going -- building on what david was saying, he was calling on his supporters to what we've heard lobby congress from the outside and picking up on what we were talking about earlier with this message about equality and the gay rights movement, that is his
also as a committee, and also as a country to develop a foreign policy that reflects, again, the dynamics of a region as they are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for this committee to finally do the work it should have done for years. when you read the report, and you realize we have never done an authorization, we have never looked at how foreign aid is spent, never done a top to bottom review. i know it's something that people like you look at as something that is healthy, and can be done in partnership. i know there was some mention of cost. and i was really disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of two people that i respect was money, money, money. the fact is the this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spend, or if that could have prevented what happened in benghazi. so i look at this as a tremendous opportunity, and i want to close, again, by thanking you for your service, for your friendship, for your transparency, and i certainly look forward to your testimony. i know it will
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
, yesterday the president didn't touch on foreign policy very much in his inauguration speech, but he did a little bit. i just wanted to play you a part of what he said. here's the president. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. >> senator, obviously few would disagree with what he said there. it's pretty basic, eloquently said, as much of what he says is. but with three americans dead in a terror attack in 48 hours before he was speaking, would it have made sense to perhaps mention that? >> well, erin, i'm not going to parse with you exactly what the president said in his inaugural address. his second inaugural address. i will simply comment that i just returned on sunday from a visit to egypt, afghanistan, jordan, i
state department and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're actually considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: he is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day after hearing it from two reporters. and i'm pretty sure her reply was something along the lines of, not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate -- >> clinton was quickly confirmed. but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> so was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been surprised. >> su
for the president. it's on foreign policy but it's on what's happening now in north africa. we had benghazi and now algeria and northern mali with the french. does he need to do more with north africa? >> i think the mistake the president gave was giving the appearance that the war against al qaeda was over. right now it's basically al qaeda in the ma grghreb in nort africa. i think the president should do more. he should focus on it more and make it clear to the american people. we may have to take some kind of action. the american people won't know what's happening because the president isn't talking about it. i think he has to lay the groundwork we have a serious situation that in many ways al qaeda is stronger than it was ten years ago. now it's metastasized and morphed. >> you're the chairman of the homeland -- >> actually i'm not anymore. i'm term limited out. >> still on the committee. before the first obama inaugural there was a lot of chatter. it seems pretty quiet. security officials say they feel much more confident. have you heard anything? >> for all i know -- as far as i know everythi
years and you saw he lost some foreign policy issuei. if the first year, he was dominant. and he was not as big a force in the republican party because people knew he was not going to be on the electoral battlefield. >> i think that's right, john. from his point of view, what he also -- he has to worry not only about whether hillary clinton's going to get in, not only about his own age and health, he has to worry about the overall success of this partnership. he has a very strong self-interest in seeing barack obama succeed. as you well know, after eight years of one party being in office, it's not easy to hold on to that office. and one of the things that helped to elect george h.w. bush at the end of reagan was reagan went out on a high. he had some trouble in the second term but he went out on a high. and that really helped bush. i think that's important for biden that president obama succeed. >> i just missed this one but the last vice president before george h.w. bush was martin van buren. >> biden has constantly been in and out of the dog house for say things he wasn't supp
another must be equal as well. >> reporter: foreign policy absent from his address, though he heralded the end of a decade of war, and touted the economy. >> the commitments we may teach each other, these things do not sap our nation, they strengthen us. >> reporter: the president mostly refrained from partisan jabs but appeared to single out his former gop opponent mitt romney with this line. >> they do not make us a nation of takers. ♪ >> reporter: filling the air with patriotism, the voices of kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ >> reporter: there was a poem and prayers. as he left the front of the capitol, a nostalgic president turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: before the president gets back to work, he heads to the washington national cathedral for an interfaith service for prayers to be offered up for the country and the president. it's a tradition that dates back to fdr. soledad. >> dan lothian, thank you. for the night and parties at night, really party mode in the nation's capital, while
. a lot of foreign policy experience and not a lot of domestic policy experience. how do you read the announcement? >> he has jack lew. he has joe biden to send up for the all-important relationships on capitol hill. i think this was a legacy pick. the president now has as we know an ambitious agenda that he laid out in the inaugural address. the question is, who is going to protect those goals from him? it's someone he has been with ever since his federal public life has started. that's mcdonough. this is somebody he trusts to protect not just himself. not just the staff, but to move that legacy and the obama era sooner or later will come to an end. the president clearly wants to make the major shape now. i think that's why he picked this man he trusts and has known for so long. >> john kerry ends before the senate foreign relations committee and he will be confirmed. i don't think there is any doubt about that. chuck hagel, that could be a little bit more. >> i think they will rough him up and be more lively than the john kerry hearings. in the end, the numbers. once senator sch
to lead our state department and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> reporter: what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're actually considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: philippe reines is her deputy assistant. >> i think she said not for a million reasons. >> reporter: if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate. >> reporter: she was quickly confirmed. how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> reporter: was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone has been surprised. >> reporter: surprised that while secretary clinton and president obama have been separated often, as she tr
, when it comes to foreign po policy. this is going to be a team that might not push back as much with regard to cuts or withdrawals or smaller footprints. so i think there may be differences in policy, but in terms of the worth of man for handling the job, they received there, not at all. >> since you went there, let me just switch where i was going and ask you about the smaller footprint. because we do have coming up, the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan, at the end of the year, and we are seeing republicans already going no, i think we had lindsay graham on, we talked about up to 20,000. it's too important not to leave a substantial footprint there. and yet i think the general is right, that we now have a team that seems to be more in sync with president obama and they want a very small footprint, you talked in your book. are they ready for a u.s. troop withdrawal when the time comes. >> i certainly wouldn't try to sell senior officers exactly how many people are required. but i think we have offered a strategic partnership to afghanistan. >> it means trust, an
is an expert when it comes to foreign policy and international affairs. he broke some eggs over there in those particular institutions. so he's no pushover, but i think the most important thing here is exactly what you noticed. and that is that relationship. we are starting the second term of the obama administration, believe it or not, time is short before people begin to turn to the future. right now, yes, the president is working for the country, et cetera, et cetera, but this is also about legacy. i think this is a legacy chief of staff pick. this is somebody who has been with him from the -- been with the president from the beginning of his federal office days, when he was a senator-elect, first met, et cetera. so he's been there from the beginning. he has the president's back. the president understands that. this is someone i think the president is entrusting, not just with the staff at the white house and all the things that come with that chief of staff role, but also with the obama era as it will, at some point the obama era will be written up and so much of what -- we can tell from t
and on down bear responsibility. it was contradictory when it came to actual foreign policy and the question -- what difference does it make -- it makes a difference if the attackers were local vendors hiding rocket propelled grenade launchers in hummus or international terrorists who have been popping up in algeria in that hostage situation where three americans were killed. clearly to understand what happened, how to prevent it, and bring the perpetrators to justice it makes a difference. >> hummus -- i like how you worked that in. this week marked the anniversary of the roe v. wade decision. an interesting backdrop for a new bill proposed in new mexico where a republican state lawmaker wants a law that would punish a rape victim if she becomes pregnant from the attack and has an abortion. she would be charged with tampering with evidence. let me get your take on this, amy. i'll go to you first. >> yeah. i looked at the story, it was so strange. and i did a bit more research. in fact, that female lawmaker i should underscore, she said that that was very misinterpreted. and in fact, she has
a foreign policy that can doing development as well as diplomacy that can reach out to women's groups, to youth, to entrepreneurs, to religious groups. that's the softer side. but it's also the smart side. and it's not john kerry's natural bailiwick, but it's very important that he build on that legacy. >> i take it that state department will be much different under kerry. and marie slaughter, thank you very much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> a woman accused of stabbing her boyfriend more than 20 times is claiming self-defense. it's one of the hottest trials going on right now. we'll dig deeper on the jodi arias trial with hln's jane velez-mitchell just ahead. >> one day when he drove home from a little league game, i saw a homeless man with a cardboard sign that said "need a meal." so i told my mom i wanted to do something. >> will larsy is a 9-year-old child. i hesitate to call him child. i think he's in a category of his own. as a 7-year-old, he decided he was going to take on this issue of hunger. >> welcome to frogs. >> my group is called frogs and it means friends reaching o
an extraordinary run at it in terms of foreign policy. i think secretary clinton has supported the president. i think that's reestablished our standing around the world. i think they managed an exceedingly complex, fast moving and difficult situations in a very skilled manner. i think she gets high marks, soledad, both from republicans and democrats, and from the american people and internationally. >> so she talked about how hard it is on the spouse, and he talked about how hard it is on the staff. so i guess my question would be is bill clinton kind of over it? you've known him since you were 5 years old. he's been very supportive of president obama. critical, i think it's fair to say, but has he also moved on? or is the spouse always struggling? >> i think both made good points in terms of the spouse and the staff. i think that's understandable and true. but i think you have to go to president clinton's speech in charlotte, which i think was a pivotal moment in the obama re-election campaign. that was a powerful speech making the case for the president's re-election. so i think the answer is
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
of america now weighing a change to a policy against allowing openly gay members. if you thought the decade or so since 9/11 was bad, wait till you see the next ten years. we got a very grim warning from the british foreign secretary william haig. he's here in "the situation room."ve exactly how they want. with scottrade's online banking, i get one view of my bank and brokerage accounts with one login... to easily move my money when i need to. plus, when i call my local scottrade office, i can talk to someone who knows how i trade. because i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. awarded five-stars from smartmoney magazine. did you just turn your ringer off so no one would interrupt and.us?one. oh no, i... just used my geico app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. >>> after a wave of protests, a huge chan
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)